Electoral Newsfile 124: Federal Election 2004 Results Guide

Updated: 7 February 2011

June 2005

Contents

Key dates
Issue of writs 31 August 2004
Close of roll 7 September 2004
Close of nominations 16 September 2004
Declaration of nominations 17 September 2004
Election day 9 October 2004
Return of the writs: House of Representatives 11 November 2004
Return of the writs: Senate  
New South Wales 3 November 2004
Victoria 5 November 2004
Queensland 1 November 2004
Western Australia 5 November 2004
South Australia 2 November 2004
Tasmania 3 November 2004
Australian Capital Territory 11 November 2004
Northern Territory 11 November 2004

Enrolment

Enrolment
  2004 2001
NSW 4 329 115 4 227 937
VIC 3 309 800 3 234 874
QLD 2 475 611 2 336 698
WA 1 248 732 1 206 422
SA 1 051 923 1 039 025
TAS 342 809 331 675
ACT 227 541 221 184
NT 112 930 111 022
AUS 13 098 461 12 708 837

These figures show the number of people entitled to vote on election day. They comprise enrolment at the close of rolls with subsequent adjustments such as the removal of names of electors who died after the close of rolls.

State of the parties

House of Representatives
Party 2004 2001
LP 74 68
NP 12 13
CLP 1 1
ALP 60 65
IND 3 3
Total 150 150
Senate
Party Elected 9 Oct 2004 Full Senate*
ALP 16 27
LP 17 33
NP 3 5
CLP 1 1
CLR - 1
DEM - 4
FFP 1 1
GRN 2 4
Total 40 76

*This column shows the number of seats each party will hold in the Senate from 1 July 2005.

Votes cast (%)
  2004 2001
House of Representatives
ordinary votes 82.46 84.36
absent votes 6.03 6.22
provisional votes 0.73 0.67
pre-poll votes 5.81 4.79
postal votes 4.96 3.96
Informal voting
House of Representatives 5.18 4.82
Senate 3.75 3.89
Turnout (House of Representatives) 94.32 94.85
Senate 2004 results: state of the full Senate from 1 July 2005
Party NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total
ALP 4 4 4 4 5 4 1 1 27
LP 4 5 5 6 6 6 1 - 33
NP 2 1 2 - - - - - 5
CLP - - - - - - - 1 1
CLR 1 - - - - - - - 1
DEM - 1 1 1 1 - - - 4
FFP - 1 - - - - - - 1
GRN 1 - - 1 - 2 - - 4
Total 12 12 12 12 12 12 2 2 76
Senate results 1980–2004
Year ALP LP NP CLP CLR DEM FFP GRN GWA HAN HAR IND NDP VPG Total
2004 16 17 3 1 - - 1 2 - - - - - - 40
27 33 5 1 1 4 1 4 - - - - - - 76
2001 13 17 2 1 1 4 - 2 - - - - - - 40
27 31 3 1 1 8 - 2 - 1 1 1 - - 76
1998 17 15 1 1 - 4 - - - 1 1 - - - 40
29 31 3 1 - 9 - 1 - 1 1 - - - 76
1996 14 17 2 1 - 5 - 1 - - - - - - 40
29 31 5 1 - 7 - 1 1 - 1 - - - 76
1993 17 15 3 1 - 2 - - 1 - 1 - - - 40
30 30 5 1 - 7 - - 2 - 1 - - - 76
1990 15 16 2 1 - 5 - - 1 - - - - - 40
32 29 4 1 - 8 - - 1 - 1 - - - 76
1987* 32 27 6 1 - 7 - - - - 1 - 1 1 76
32 27 6 1 - 7 - - - - 1 - 1 1 76
1984 20 16 3 1 - 5 - - - - - - 1 - 46
34 27 5 1 - 7 - - - - 1 - 1 - 76
1983* 30 23 4 1 - 5 - - - - 1 - - - 64
30 23 4 1 - 5 - - - - 1 - - - 64
1980 15 13 2 - - 3 - - - - - 1 - - 34
27 28 3 - - 5 - - - - - 1 - - 64

*The elections held in 1983 and 1987 were double dissolution elections.

House of Representatives 2004 results
Party NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total
LP 21 16 17 10 8 2 - - 74
NP 6 2 4 - - - - - 12
ALP 21 19 6 5 3 3 2 1 60
CLP - - - - - - - 1 1
IND 2 - 1 - - - - - 3
Total 50 37 28 15 11 5 2 2 150
House of Representatives results 1980–2004
Year ALP LP NP/CLP IND Total
2004 60 74 13 3 150
2001 65 68 14 3 150
1998 67 64 16 1 148
1996 49 75 19 5 148
1993 80 49 16 2 147
1990 78 55 14 1 148
1987 86 43 19 - 148
1984 82 45 21 - 148
1983 75 33 17 - 125
1980 51 54 20 - 125
Two Party Preferred figures 1993–2004 (%)
Year Party NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT AUS
2004 ALP 48.1 49.0 42.9 44.6 45.6 54.2 61.5 52.1 47.3
LP/NP 51.9 51.0 57.1 55.4 54.4 45.8 38.5 47.9 52.7
2001 ALP 48.3 52.1 45.1 48.4 45.9 57.7 61.1 52.5 49.1
LP/NP 51.7 47.9 54.9 51.6 54.1 42.3 38.9 47.5 50.9
1998 ALP 51.5 53.5 47.0 49.5 46.9 57.3 62.4 50.6 51.0
LP/NP 48.5 46.5 53.0 50.5 53.1 42.7 37.6 49.4 49.0
1996 ALP 47.4 50.3 39.8 44.0 42.7 51.6 55.5 49.6 46.4
LP/NP 52.6 49.7 60.2 56.0 57.3 48.4 44.5 50.4 53.6
1993 ALP 54.4 51.8 48.4 46.0 47.3 54.7 61.2 55.3 51.4
LP/NP 45.6 48.2 51.6 54.0 52.7 45.3 38.8 44.7 48.6

The 20 most marginal seats

The following seats are the 20 most marginal seats across Australia based on the 2004 federal election results. The total number of marginal seats is 47 out of 150.

The 20 most marginal seats
Division Status Two-Party-Preferred (%) Sitting Member
Hindmarsh (SA) Marginal Labor 50.06 Steve Georganas (ALP)
Kingston (SA) Marginal Liberal 50.07 Kym Richardson (LP)
Swan (WA) Marginal Labor 50.08 Kim Wilkie (ALP)
Richmond (NSW) Marginal Labor 50.19 Justine Elliot (ALP)
Bonner* (QLD) Marginal Liberal 50.51 Ross Vasta (LP)
Greenway (NSW) Marginal Liberal 50.58 Louise Markus (LP)
Wakefield (SA) Marginal Liberal 50.67 David Fawcett (LP)
Parramatta (NSW) Marginal Labor 50.77 Julie Owens (ALP)
Cowan (WA) Marginal Labor 50.78 Graham Edwards (ALP)
Makin (SA) Marginal Liberal 50.93 Trish Draper (LP)
Bendigo (VIC) Marginal Labor 50.96 Steve Gibbons (ALP)
Banks (NSW) Marginal Labor 51.06 Daryl Melham (ALP)
Calare** (NSW) Marginal Liberal 51.10 Peter Andren (IND)
Braddon (TAS) Marginal Liberal 51.13 Mark Baker (LP)
Adelaide (SA) Marginal Labor 51.33 Kate Ellis (ALP)
Isaacs (VIC) Marginal Labor 51.48 Ann Corcoran (ALP)
Holt (VIC) Marginal Labor 51.51 Anthony Byrne (ALP)
Hasluck (WA) Marginal Liberal 51.82 Stuart Henry (LP)
Stirling (WA) Marginal Liberal 52.04 Michael Keenan (LP)
Eden-Monaro (NSW) Marginal Liberal 52.14 Gary Nairn (LP)

*The newly created seat of Bonner was first contested in 2004.

**At the 2004 federal election Calare was won by an Independent candidate, however for statistical purposes another count was conducted to determine the status of the seat on a two-party-preferred basis and those results were used in this table.

Seat Status

Seat status is generally based on the Two-Party-Preferred (TPP) figures from the last election. TPP figures indicate results where preferences have been distributed to the major sides of politics, the ALP and the Coalition (LP/NP).

By convention, when a party receives less than 56% of the vote the seat is classified as marginal, 56–60% is classified as fairly safe and more than 60% is considered safe.

Seats where preferences decided the 2004 result

New South Wales (18)

  • Banks (ALP)
  • Barton (ALP)
  • Bennelong (LP)
  • Charlton (ALP)
  • Cunningham (ALP)
  • Dobell (LP)
  • Eden-Monaro (LP)
  • Greenway (LP)
  • Kingsford Smith (ALP)
  • Lindsay (LP)
  • Lowe (ALP)
  • Newcastle (ALP)
  • Page (NP)
  • Parramatta (ALP)
  • Richmond (ALP)
  • Shortland (ALP)
  • Sydney (ALP)
  • Wentworth (LP)

Victoria (11)

  • Ballarat (ALP)
  • Bendigo (ALP)
  • Bruce (ALP)
  • Chisholm (ALP)
  • Corio (ALP)
  • Gippsland (NP)
  • Holt (ALP)
  • Isaacs (ALP)
  • Jagajaga (ALP)
  • McMillan (LP)
  • Melbourne Ports (ALP)

Queensland (12)

  • Bonner (LP)
  • Brisbane (ALP)
  • Capricornia (ALP)
  • Dawson (NP)
  • Griffith (ALP)
  • Herbert (LP)
  • Hinkler (NP)
  • Kennedy (IND)
  • Lilley (ALP)
  • Moreton (LP)
  • Rankin (ALP)
  • Wide Bay (NP)

Western Australia (8)

  • Brand (ALP)
  • Cowan (ALP)
  • Fremantle (ALP)
  • Hasluck (LP)
  • Kalgoorlie (LP)
  • Perth (ALP)
  • Stirling (LP)
  • Swan (ALP)

South Australia (5)

  • Adelaide (ALP)
  • Hindmarsh (ALP)
  • Kingston (LP)
  • Makin (LP)
  • Wakefield (LP)

Tasmania (5)

  • Bass (LP)
  • Braddon (LP)
  • Denison (ALP)
  • Franklin (ALP)
  • Lyons (ALP)

Australian Capital Territory (1)

  • Canberra (ALP)

Northern Territory (1)

  • Solomon (CLP)

Seats won outright in 2004

(where the winning candidate received 50% plus 1 of the first preference votes)

New South Wales (32)

  • Berowra (LP)
  • Blaxland (ALP)
  • Bradfield (LP)
  • Calare (IND)
  • Chifley (ALP)
  • Cook (LP)
  • Cowper (NP)
  • Farrer (LP)
  • Fowler (ALP)
  • Gilmore (LP)
  • Grayndler (ALP)
  • Gwydir (NP)
  • Hughes (LP)
  • Hume (LP)
  • Hunter (ALP)
  • Lyne (NP)
  • Macarthur (LP)
  • Mackellar (LP)
  • Macquarie (LP)
  • Mitchell (LP)
  • New England (IND)
  • North Sydney (LP)
  • Parkes (NP)
  • Paterson (LP)
  • Prospect (ALP)
  • Reid (ALP)
  • Riverina (NP)
  • Robertson (LP)
  • Throsby (ALP)
  • Warringah (LP)
  • Watson (ALP)
  • Werriwa (ALP)

Victoria (26)

  • Aston (LP)
  • Batman (ALP)
  • Calwell (ALP)
  • Casey (LP)
  • Corangamite (LP)
  • Deakin (LP)
  • Dunkley (LP)
  • Flinders (LP)
  • Gellibrand (ALP)
  • Goldstein (LP)
  • Gorton (ALP)
  • Higgins (LP)
  • Hotham (ALP)
  • Indi (LP)
  • Kooyong (LP)
  • La Trobe (LP)
  • Lalor (ALP)
  • Mallee (NP)
  • Maribyrnong (ALP)
  • McEwen (LP)
  • Melbourne (ALP)
  • Menzies (LP)
  • Murray (LP)
  • Scullin (ALP)
  • Wannon (LP)
  • Wills (ALP)

Queensland (16)

  • Blair (LP)
  • Bowman (LP)
  • Dickson (LP)
  • Fadden (LP)
  • Fairfax (LP)
  • Fisher (LP)
  • Forde (LP)
  • Groom (LP)
  • Leichhardt (LP)
  • Longman (LP)
  • Maranoa (NP)
  • McPherson (LP)
  • Moncrieff (LP)
  • Oxley (ALP)
  • Petrie (LP)
  • Ryan (LP)

Western Australia (7)

  • Canning (LP)
  • Curtin (LP)
  • Forrest (LP)
  • Moore (LP)
  • OConnor (LP)
  • Pearce (LP)
  • Tangney (LP)

South Australia (6)

  • Barker (LP)
  • Boothby (LP)
  • Grey (LP)
  • Mayo (LP)
  • Port Adelaide (ALP)
  • Sturt (LP)

Australian Capital Territory (1)

  • Fraser (ALP)

Northern Territory (1)

  • Lingiari (ALP)
Seats which changed parties at 2004 election
Division Previous incumbent Party Successful candidate Party
New South Wales (3)
Greenway Frank Mossfield ALP Louise Markus LP
Parramatta Ross Cameron LP Julie Owens ALP
Richmond Larry Anthony NP Justine Elliot ALP
Victoria (1)
McMillan Christian Zahra ALP Russell Broadbent LP
Queensland (1)
Bowman Con Sciacca ALP Andrew Laming LP
Western Australia (2)
Hasluck Sharryn Jackson ALP Stuart Henry LP
Stirling Jann McFarlane ALP Michael Keenan LP
South Australia (3)
Adelaide Trish Worth LP Kate Ellis ALP
Hindmarsh Chris Gallus LP Steve Georganas ALP
Kingston David Cox ALP Kym Richardson LP
Tasmania (2)
Bass Michelle OByrne ALP Michael Ferguson LP
Braddon Sid Sidebottom ALP Mark Baker LP

Please note that the above compares party representation immediately after the 2001 and 2004 elections. Results of any by-elections have been ignored.

Seats which changed leading candidate during 2004 count

(where the leader on first preferences lost after the full distribution of preferences)

Seats which changed leading candidate during 2004 count
Division Leader on first preferences Successful candidate
Parramatta (NSW) Ross Cameron (LP) Julie Owens (ALP)
Richmond (NSW) Larry Anthony (NP) Justine Elliot (ALP)
Adelaide (SA) Trish Worth (LP) Kate Ellis (ALP)
Hindmarsh (SA) Simon Birmingham (LP) Steve Georganas (ALP)
Bendigo (VIC) Kevin Gibbins (LP) Steve Gibbons (ALP)
Melbourne Ports (VIC) David Southwick (LP) Michael Danby (ALP)
Cowan (WA) Luke Simpkins (LP) Graham Edwards (ALP)
Swan (WA) Andrew Peter Murfin (LP) Kim Wilkie (ALP)

Nominations by State/Territory 2001–2004

House of Representatives
  Seats 2004 Seats 2001
NSW 50 382 50 395
VIC 37 257 37 225
QLD 28 205 27 179
WA 15 124 15 116
SA 11 76 12 71
TAS 5 25 5 27
ACT 2 10 2 13
NT 2 12 2 13
Female candidates   299   288
Male candidates   791   751
*Unknown   1   -
Total 150 1 091 150 1 039

* Details of gender were not provided.

Senate
  Seats 2004 2001
NSW 6 78 65
VIC 6 65 52
QLD 6 50 40
WA 6 40 46
SA 6 47 26
TAS 6 26 29
ACT 2 13 14
NT 2 11 13
Female candidates   107 93
Male candidates   223 192
Total 40 330 285
Total number of registered political parties that fielded candidates
2004 2001
51 49
Informal voting 1993–2004 (%)
State/Territory House of Representatives Senate
2004 2001 1998 1996 1993 2004 2001 1998 1996 1993
NSW 6.1 5.4 4.0 3.6 3.1 3.5 3.5 3.3 3.8 2.7
VIC 4.1 4.0 3.5 2.9 2.8 5.1 5.6 3.8 3.6 3.1
QLD 5.2 4.8 3.3 2.6 2.6 2.8 3.0 3.0 3.3 2.0
WA 5.3 4.9 4.2 3.2 2.5 3.5 3.6 2.7 3.5 2.1
SA 5.6 5.5 4.5 4.1 4.1 3.5 3.1 2.8 3.3 2.3
TAS 3.6 3.4 3.1 2.4 2.7 3.4 3.3 3.1 3.2 2.6
ACT 3.4 3.5 2.9 2.8 3.4 2.5 2.3 2.0 2.5 1.6
NT 4.5 4.6 4.2 3.4 3.1 3.1 2.8 2.0 2.8 2.8
AUS 5.2 4.8 3.8 3.2 3.0 3.8 3.9 3.2 3.5 2.6
House: Types of votes by State/Territory 2004 (%)
State/Territory Ordinary Absent Provisional Pre-poll Postal
NSW 82.38 5.99 0.70 6.32 4.62
VIC 81.93 5.76 0.71 5.97 5.63
QLD 82.71 5.72 0.63 5.04 5.90
WA 81.82 8.82 1.13 4.84 3.39
SA 84.72 6.22 0.49 4.09 4.48
TAS 85.15 4.59 1.02 4.41 4.83
ACT 77.85 2.02 1.22 15.41 3.50
NT 82.75 2.18 1.24 10.56 3.27
AUS 82.46 6.03 0.73 5.81 4.96
House: Turnout 1980–2004 (%)
Year Event Turnout (%)
2004 Election 94.32
2001 Election 94.85
1998 Election 94.99
1996 Election 95.77
1993 Election 95.75
1990 Election 95.32
1987 Election 93.84
1984 Election and Referendum 94.17
1983 Election 94.64
1980 Election 94.35
Election costs 1993–2004
Year Average cost per elector (GST exclusive) ($)
2004 5.79
2001 5.09
1998 5.21
1996 5.08
1993 4.11

Please note that the above costs do not include public funding. For details on public funding payments made in respect of the 2004 election see below.

2004 election funding payments
Name Amount
Liberal Party of Australia $17 956 326.48
Australian Labor Party $16 710 043.43
Australian Greens $3 316 702.48
National Party of Australia $2 966 531.27
Northern Territory Country Liberal Party $158 973.97
Family First Party $158 451.04
Pauline Hanson's One Nation $56 215.73
Australian Democrats $8 491.26
Christian Democratic Party (Fred Nile Group) $6 572.56
No Goods and Services Tax Party $5 995.20
Pauline Hanson $199 886.77
Antony (Tony) Windsor $89 562.59
Peter Andren $79 413.12
Robert (Bob) Katter $63 544.49
Peter King $25 730.39
Brian Deegan $24 449.31
Lars Hedberg $19 400.82
Graeme Campbell $12 935.18
Robert (Rob) Bryant $12 120.65
Robert Dunn $11 761.02
Margaret F Menzel $10 977.60
Darren Power $9 980.34
Bruce Haigh $7 381.25
Jeanette (Jen) Sackley $7 365.70
Samir (Sam) Bargshoon $7 346.26
Total election funding paid $41 926 158.91
Election dates 1980–2004
Election day Government elected Seats won Total no. of seats
9 October 2004 LP/NP/CLP 87 150
10 November 2001 LP/NP/CLP 82 150
3 October 1998 LP/NP 80 148
2 March 1996 LP/NP/CLP 94 148
13 March 1993 ALP 80 147
24 March 1990 ALP 78 148
11 July 1987 ALP 86 148
1 December 1984 ALP 82 148
5 March 1983 ALP 75 125
18 October 1980 LP/NP/NCP 74 125

Key words

Absent vote

A vote cast by an elector out of their enrolled division but still within their home State/Territory on election day.

Divisions (electorates/seats)

Australia is divided into 150 voting districts known as divisions, electorates or seats. One member is elected from each Division to the House of Representatives.

Election funding

A candidate or Senate group is eligible for election funding if they obtain at least four per cent of the formal first preference vote in the division or the State/Territory they contested.

Informal vote

A vote cast in an election that has not been marked according to the rules of that election.

Ordinary vote

A vote cast at a polling place in the electors enrolled division on election day.

Political party

Political parties can register with the AEC for federal elections. Registered parties are eligible to have the party affiliation of their candidates printed on ballot papers.

Postal and pre-poll votes

Votes cast before election day by post or at a pre-poll voting centre by electors who for various reasons are unable to attend a polling place in their home State/Territory on election day.

Provisional vote

A vote cast in circumstances where an electors name cannot be found on the roll or has already been marked off the roll as having voted. They are not counted until a careful check of enrolment records has been made.

Roll

The list of electors eligible to vote at an election.

Two-candidate-preferred (TCP)

TCP figures show where preferences have been distributed to the final two candidates in an election.

Two-party-preferred (TPP)

TPP figures indicate results where preferences have been distributed to the two major sides of politics, the ALP and the Coalition (LP/NP). In most cases TPP is the same as TCP because the final two candidates are ALP and Coalition. However, in an independently held seat or where the final two candidates are not the ALP and Coalition, the TPP differs from the TCP.

Turnout

The percentage of enrolled electors who voted in an election or referendum.

2004 election logistics

Polling facilities

Ordinary polling places

  • No. of ordinary polling places: 7 729

Mobile polling teams

  • No. of mobile polling teams who visited special hospitals: 445
  • No. of special hospitals visited: 2 107
  • No. of mobile polling teams who visited remote locations: 43
  • No. of remote locations visited: 382
  • No. of mobile polling teams who visited prisons: 17
  • No. of prisons visited: 21

Pre-poll centres

  • No. of pre-poll voting centres: 309

Overseas polling places

  • No. of overseas polling places: 100

Temporary staff

  • Approximate number of temporary staff who assisted in the conduct of the election: 67 000
  • No. of call centre operators trained to answer inquiries for the election: 450

Polling equipment

  • No. of ballot boxes: 45 505
  • No. of voting screens: 150 599
  • No. of recycling bins: 13 893
  • No. of tables: 6 875
  • No. of queuing signs: 10 462

Website

  • No. of hits on AEC election results site on election night: over 13.5 million

Whenever possible the AEC uses cardboard and paper equipment manufactured from recycled materials that are in turn recyclable and reusable.

Party abbreviations

ALP: Australian Labor Party; CLP: Northern Territory Country Liberal Party; CLR: Country Labor Party; DEM: Australian Democrats; FFP: Family First Party; GRN: Australian Greens; GWA: The Greens (WA) Inc; HAN: Pauline Hansons One Nation; HAR: Tasmanian Independent Senator Brian Harradine Group; IND: Independent; LP: Liberal Party of Australia; NCP: National Country Party; NDP: Nuclear Disarmament Party; NP: National Party of Australia; VPG: Vallentine Peace Group.

Contacts