Electoral Newsfile 99: Federal Election 2001 Information Guide

Updated: 23 March 2011

2001 Federal Election

The Prime Minister, Mr John Howard, announced on Friday 5 October 2001 that an election for the House of Representatives and half the Senate will be held on Saturday 10 November 2001. This will be a general election for the 40th Parliament.

The Senate

Senators for a State or Territory are chosen directly by the people of that State or Territory. Each State elects twelve Senators while the two Territories elect two Senators each.

Senators for each State are elected for six year terms on a rotating basis with a half Senate election held every three years. State Senators elected in 1996 face election at this poll. Territory Senators face election at every House of Representatives general election.

The House of Representatives

The number of Members elected to the House of Representatives from each State and Territory is proportional to the number of people, except that at least five Members must be chosen in each original State.

The political party or coalition of parties that has a majority in the House of Representatives forms the Government.

Each Member of the House of Representatives is elected to represent an electoral division. Within each State and Territory, each Division contains a similar number of electors. For the 2001 federal election, Australia is divided into 150 electoral divisions.

The maximum term of the House of Representatives is three years taken from the date on which the newly elected House first meets.

KEY DATES

Issue of writ: Monday, 8 October 2001

The issue of the writ triggers the election process. It is a document commanding an electoral officer to hold an election and contains dates for the close of rolls, the close of nominations, the polling day and the return of the writ.

Close of rolls: Monday, 15 October 2001

Electors have until 8pm, seven days after the writ is issued to enrol or to update their details on the Commonwealth electoral roll.

Close of nominations: Thursday, 18 October 2001

It is not possible to nominate as a candidate until the writ has been issued. Candidates must nominate by 12 noon on the date specified in the writ as close of nominations.

Declaration of nominations: Friday, 19 October 2001

Twenty four hours after the close of nominations are publicly declared, draws for positions on the ballot papers are conducted.

Polling day: Saturday 10 November 2001

The day on which the majority of electors cast their vote at a polling place. It must be a Saturday and at least 33 days after the issue of the writ.

Return of the writ: Wednesday, 16 January 2002

After the Senate polls are declared, the Australian Electoral Officer for each State and Territory returns the writ endorsed with the names of the successful candidates to the State Governor (or Governor-General in the case of the Territories).

For the House of Representatives, the Electoral Commissioner endorses on the writ the name of each candidate elected for each Division and returns the writ to the Governor-General.

Information at a glance

STATE OF THE PARTIES
House of Representatives 1998 Election Current*
LP 64 63
NP 16 16
ALP 67 68
IND 1 1
TOTAL 148 148
Senate Elected 1998 Full Senate
LP 15 31
NP 1 3
CLP 1 1
ALP 17 29
DEM 4 9
HAR 1 1
HAN 1 1
GRN 1
TOTAL 40 76

*Following by-elections in:
Holt (Vic), Isaacs (Vic), Ryan (Qld), Aston (Vic)

NUMBER OF VACANCIES
House of Representatives: 150
Senate (half-Senate): 40

TO WIN MAJORITY GOVERNMENT a party needs 76 seats in the House of Representatives.

1999/2000 REDISTRIBUTIONS. Since the 1998 election there have been redistributions in NSW, WA, SA, TAS and NT. A new seat was created in WA, Hasluck, and the NT was divided into two seats, Solomon and Lingiari.

ESTIMATED ELECTION COST $68 million (without public funding)

ESTIMATED ENROLMENT 12 500 000

TURNOUT 1998 FEDERAL ELECTION 95.34%

NUMBER OF REGISTERED PARTIES 64

PREVIOUS ENROLMENT STATISTICS

Electoral enrolment

Voting in a federal election is compulsory for all people listed on the Commonwealth electoral roll at the close of rolls for the election. The roll for this election will close at 8pm Monday, 15 October 2001.

To be eligible to enrol a person must be an Australian citizen, aged 18 years or over. British subjects who were on the Commonwealth electoral roll immediately before 26 January 1984 maintain their enrolment and voting entitlements. People who are 17 may provisionally enrol and will be able to vote if their 18th birthday falls on or before polling day.

Special enrolment is available for certain electors. People with a physical disability, illness, or their carers, are able to apply to become general postal voters; people going overseas may register as overseas electors; people with no fixed address may enrol as itinerant electors; people working in Antarctica may register as Antarctic voters; and people may apply for silent enrolment if they believe that publication of their address on the roll would put them at risk.

Enrolment statistics
State/Territory 1998 1996
NSW 4 076 081 3 955 782
VIC 3 081 632 2 972 635
QLD 2 188 024 2 091 384
WA 1 149 619 1 088 487
SA 1 013 989 1 001 006
TAS 330 121 329 304
ACT 209 536 203 170
NT 105 048 98 800
TOTAL 12 154 050 11 740 568
These are the close of rolls figures with subsequent adjustments such as the removal of the names of electors who died after the close of rolls, the reinstatement of eligible electors who had been previously removed and the inclusion of provisional enrollees who turned 18 by polling day.

PREVIOUS NOMINATIONS STATISTICS

Who can nominate as a candidate?

Candidates must be nominated before they can be elected to the Senate or the House of Representatives. The qualifications for the Senate and the House of Representatives are the same.

To be nominated as a candidate for the Senate or the House of Representatives, a person must be:

  • at least 18 years old;
  • an Australian citizen; and
  • an elector or qualified to be an elector.

It is not possible to nominate until the writ for an election has been issued. People wishing to nominate may obtain a nomination form from any AEC office or from the website www.aec.gov.au. Nominations cannot be withdrawn after the closing date.

Nominations for the Senate are made to the Australian Electoral Officer (AEO) for the State or Territory for which the candidate is nominating.

Nominations for the House of Representatives are made at the office of the Divisional Returning Officer (DRO) for the division in which the candidate is nominating.

Senate candidates are required to pay a $700 deposit on nomination and House of Representatives candidates pay $350. These deposits are returned if a candidate gains more than four percent of the formal first preference vote, or if they are in a group of Senate candidates which polls more than four percent.

No-one can nominate for more than one election held on the same day. This means that it is not possible to nominate for more than one division, for more than one State or Territory or both.

Further information on nominating is in the Candidate's Handbook available from any AEC office or on the AEC's website.

At the 2001 Federal Election, candidates will be nominating for 40 Senate vacancies and will contest 150 House of Representatives seats.

Order of names on ballot papers

Two draws are conducted to determine the order of names on the ballot paper. The first draw provides the candidates or groups with a number. The second draw allocates a position to each number (i.e. candidate or group) on the ballot paper.

Candidate nominations 1990–1998
  Number of Senate candidates Number of House of Representatives candidates
State/Territory 1998 1996 1993 1990 1998 1996 1993 1990
NSW 69 63 66 62 392** 319 309 284
VIC 63 44 51 38 289 214 213 188
QLD 57 48 42 33 192 180 206* 111
WA 45 29 33 30 109 80 85 92
SA 35 31 36 26 78 74 90 69
TAS 32 19 20 16 27 23 23 20
ACT 17 14 14 12 15 13 15 11
NT 11 7 4 6 7 5 2 7
TOTAL 329 255 266 223 1 109 908 943 782
* Please note this Queensland figure includes candidates for the supplementary election in the Division of Dickson.
** Please note this New South Wales figure includes candidates for the supplementary election in the Division of Newcastle.
Senate nominations 1998
Party NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT TOTAL
LP 3 5 4 4 4 4 2 0 26
NP 1 1 3 2 2 0 0 0 9
CLP               2 2
ALP 4 4 3 6 3 3 2 2 27
DEM 4 4 3 3 4 3 2 2 25
HAR           1     1
HAN 3 2 5 3 3 3 2 2 23
GRN 4 3 3   2 2 2 2 18
OTHER* 13 3 6 4 7       33
House of Representatives nominations 1998
Party NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT TOTAL
LP 44 35 22 14 12 5 2   134
NP 12 3 10 4 3       32
CLP               1 1
ALP 50 37 27 14 12 5 2 1 148
DEM 50 37 27 14 12 5 2 1 148
HAN 50 30 27 14 12 3 2 1 139
GRN 45 27 27   2 5 2 1 109
OTHER* 2 2   1 1       6

* OTHER represents candidates who are non-affiliated and have chosen not to have 'Independent' printed beside their name on the ballot paper.

Entitlement to election funding

A candidate is eligible for election funding if they receive at least four per cent of the formal first preference votes.

Amount of funding paid

The amount paid is calculated by multiplying the number of formal first preference votes received by the rate of payment applicable at the time.

The rate set for the period 1 July to 31 December 2001 is 1.79 cents per formal first preference vote in either a House of Representatives or Senate election. This rate is indexed every six months to increases in the Consumer Price Index.

Payment arrangements

At least 95% of election funding is paid automatically as soon as possible after the 20th day following polling day. Any balance of entitlement is paid directly following the conclusion of the counting of votes.

Payments for candidates and groups endorsed by political parties are made directly to their parties, and payments for independent candidates are made to their agents.

Election returns

All candidates, and Senate groups must disclose gifts received and electoral expenditure incurred. Other third parties who take part in an election campaign may also be required to disclose these details. Broadcasters and publishers are required to give details of electoral advertising placed with them. Election disclosure returns are made available for public inspection 24 weeks after polling day.

Annual returns

Every registered party and their State/Territory Branches and associated entities are required to furnish an annual return to the AEC detailing all amounts received during the financial year, all amounts paid by or on behalf of the party and all debts outstanding at 30 June. Donors to registered parties must also provide an annual return of their donations. Annual disclosure returns are made available for inspection from 1 February, (or the first working day thereafter) in the following year.

PREVIOUS VOTING STATISTICS

Types of votes

Australians can vote in federal elections by:

  • Ordinary vote: a vote cast in the elector's enrolled division on polling day.
  • Absent vote: a vote cast by an elector out of their enrolled division but still within their home State or Territory on polling day.
  • Pre-poll and postal votes: a vote cast before polling day at a pre-poll voting centre or by post. These votes can be cast by electors who will not be within their home State or Territory on polling day, are seriously ill, infirm, unable to leave work, or for religious reasons are unable to attend a polling place. (Postal votes received up to 13 days after polling day must be included in the scrutiny).
  • Provisional vote: a vote cast when an elector's name cannot be found on the roll but the elector claims the right to vote, or if the name has already been marked off the roll but the elector claims they have not voted before in the election. The vote cannot be counted until a careful check of enrolment records and entitlements has been made.
  • Mobile polling is carried out during the 12 days up to and including polling day. Mobile polling teams visit electors in hospital, prisons and in remote areas so they can cast a vote.

Electors making a postal, pre-poll, absent or provisional vote must complete a declaration giving their personal details. This is checked before the votes are counted.

Voter turnout
1998 Election 95.34%
1996 Election 96.20%
1993 Election 96.22%
1990 Election 95.81%
1987 Election 94.34%
1984 Election & Referendum 94.55%
1983 Election 94.64%
1980 Election 94.35%
1977 Election 95.08%
Voter turnout is the percentage of enrolled electors who voted.

Informal voting

A ballot paper is considered informal if it is not filled out correctly as set out in Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918. It is set aside and is not counted towards any candidate.

Informal Voting 1987–1998 (percentage)
  House of Representatives Senate
State/Territory 1998 1996 1993 1990 1987 1998 1996 1993 1990 1987
NSW 4.0 3.6 3.1 3.1 4.6 3.3 3.8 2.7 4.2 4.9
VIC 3.5 2.9 2.8 3.5 5.3 3.8 3.6 3.1 3.6 4.0
QLD 3.3 2.6 2.6 2.2 3.4 3.0 3.3 2.0 2.5 3.1
WA 4.2 3.2 2.5 3.7 6.6 2.7 3.5 2.1 2.9 3.3
SA 4.5 4.1 4.1 3.7 6.8 2.8 3.3 2.3 2.5 3.8
TAS 3.1 2.4 2.7 3.3 5.0 3.1 3.2 2.6 3.1 3.8
ACT 2.9 2.8 3.4 3.0 3.5 2.0 2.5 1.6 2.4 2.4
NT 4.2 3.4 3.1 3.4 5.8 2.0 2.8 2.8 2.8 3.7
TOTAL 3.8 3.2 3.0 3.2 4.9 3.2 3.5 2.6 3.4 4.0

PREVIOUS ELECTION RESULTS

Senate results 1977–1998
Year ALP LP NP/CLP DEM GRN HAN HAR GWA VPG NDP IND/OTH TOTAL
1998 29 31 4 9 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 76
1996 29 31 6 7 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 76
1993 30 30 6 7 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 76
1990 32 29 5 8 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 76
1987 32 27 7 7 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 76
1984 34 27 6 7 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 76
1983 30 23 5 5 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 64
1980 27 28 3 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 64
1977 26 29 6 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 64
House of Representatives results 1955–1998
Year ALP LP NP/CLP IND Total
1998 67 64 16 1 148
1996 49 75 19 5 148
1993 80 49 16 2 147
1990 78 55 14 1 148
1987 86 43 19 0 148
1984 82 45 21 0 148
1983 75 33 17 0 125
1980 51 54 20 0 125
1977 38 67 19 0 124
1975 36 68 23 0 127
1974 66 40 21 0 127
1972 67 38 20 0 125
1969 59 46 20 0 125
1966 41 61 21 1 124
1963 50 52 20 0 122
1961 60 45 17 0 122
1958 45 58 19 0 122
1955 47 57 18 0 122
Party name abbreviations
ALP: Australian Labor Party
CDP: Christian Democratic Party (Fred Nile Group)
CLP: Northern Territory Country Liberal Party
DEM: Australian Democrats
GRN: Australian Greens
GWA: The Greens (WA) Inc
HAN: Pauline Hanson's One Nation
HAR: Tasmanian Independent Senator Brian Harradine Group
IND: Independent
NDP: Nuclear Disarmament Party
LP: Liberal Party
NP: National Party
VPG: Vallentine Peace Group
OTH: Other
Senate 1998 results: State of the Senate by State and Territory
Party NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT TOTAL
ALP 5 5 4 4 4 5 1 1 29
LP 4 5 4 6 6 5 1 0 31
NP 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3
DEM 2 1 2 2 2 0 0 0 9
HAN 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
CLP 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
HAR 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
GRN 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
TOTAL 12 12 12 12 12 12 2 2 76
House of Representatives 1998 results by State and Territory
Party NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT TOTAL
LP 18 16 14 7 9 0 0 0 64
NP 9 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 16
ALP 22 19 8 7 3 5 2 1 67
IND 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
TOTAL 50 37 27 14 12 5 2 1 148
Due to the death of a candidate in the Division of Newcastle prior to polling day, a supplementary election for this seat was held on 21 November 1998. This table shows the result of the 3 October 1998 poll including the supplementary election held in Newcastle.
Historical Two Party Preferred Figures 1993–1998
Year Party NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT TOTAL
1998 ALP 51.5 53.5 47.0 49.5 46.9 57.3 62.4 50.6 51.0
LP/NP 48.5 46.5 53.0 50.5 53.1 42.7 37.6 49.4 49.0
1996 ALP 47.4 50.3 39.8 44.0 42.7 51.6 55.5 49.6 46.4
LP/NP 52.6 49.7 60.2 56.0 57.3 48.4 44.5 50.4 53.6
1993 ALP 54.4 51.8 48.4 46.0 47.3 54.7 61.2 55.3 51.4
LP/NP 45.6 48.2 51.6 54.0 52.7 45.3 38.8 44.7 48.6

LIST OF REGISTERED POLITICAL PARTIES

The register of Political Parties closed the day before the writ for the federal election was issued.

List of Registered Political Parties
Advance Australia Party
Australia First Party
Australian Democrats Australian Greens
Australian Labor Party (Victorian Branch)
Australian Labor Party (ACT Branch)
Australian Labor Party (ALP)
Australian Labor Party (NSW Branch)
Australian Labor Party (Northern Territory) Branch
Australian Labor Party (South Australian Branch)
Australian Labor Party (State of Queensland)
Australian Labor Party (Tasmanian Branch)
Australian Labor Party (Western Australian Branch)
Australian Reform Party
Australians Against Further Immigration
Australian Shooters Party
Australian Women's Party
Christian Democratic Party (Fred Nile Group)
Citizens Electoral Council of Australia
City Country Alliance
Country Labor Party
Curtin Labor Alliance
Democratic Labor Party (DLP) of Australia
Helen Caldicott's – Our Common Future Party
Help End Marijuana Prohibition
Hope Party Australia Liberal Party (WA Division) Inc.
Liberal Party of Australia
Liberal Party of Australia (NSW Division)
Liberal Party of Australia (SA Division)
Liberal Party of Australia (Victorian Division)
Liberal Party of Australia – ACT Division
Liberal Party of Australia – Queensland Division
Liberal Party of Australia – Tasmanian Division
liberals for forests
Lower Excise Fuel and Beer Party
National Party of Australia
National Party of Australia (Queensland)
National Party of Australia (SA) Inc.
National Party of Australia (WA) Inc
National Party of Australia – NSW
National Party of Australia – Tasmania
National Party of Australia – Victoria
No Goods and Services Tax Party
Non-Custodial Parents Party
Northern Territory Country Liberal Party
Nuclear Disarmament Party of Australia
Outdoor Recreation Party
Pauline Hanson's One Nation
Peter Breen – Reform The Legal System
Phil Cleary – Independent Australia
Progressive Labour Party
Queensland Greens
Republican Party of Australia
Save the ADI Site Party
Socialist Equality Party
Tasmania First Party
Tasmanian Independent Senator Brian Harradine Group
Taxi Operators Political Service (Oceania)
The Fishing Party
The Greens (WA) Inc
The Greens NSW
The Australian Greens – Victoria
Unity – Say No To Hanson
Young National Party of Australia

THE 20 MOST MARGINAL SEATS

The following seats are the twenty most marginal seats across Australia taking into account the 1998 federal election results and the 1999/2000 redistributions. A seat is classified as marginal when the two party preferred figure is less than 56 per cent.

The 20 most marginal seats
Division Status Two Party Preferred Sitting Member
Canning (WA) LP 50.04% Jane Gerick
Herbert (QLD) LP 50.10% Peter Lindsay
Dickson (QLD) ALP 50.12% Cheryl Kernot
Bass (TAS) ALP 50.19% Michelle O'Byrne
Hinkler (QLD) NP 50.34% Paul Neville
McMillan (VIC) ALP 50.57% Christian Zahra
Moreton (QLD) LP 50.57% Gary Hardgrave
Eden-Monaro (NSW) LP 50.62% Gary Nairn
Adelaide (SA) LP 50.65% Trish Worth
Petrie (QLD) LP 50.75% Teresa Gambaro
Makin (SA) LP 50.78% Trish Draper
Richmond (NSW) NP 50.83% Larry Anthony
Longman (QLD) LP 50.92% Mal Brough
La Trobe (VIC) LP 50.99% Bob Charles
McEwen (VIC) LP 51.04% Fran Bailey
Hindmarsh (SA) LP 51.23% Chris Gallus
Kingston (SA) ALP 51.88% David Cox
Paterson (NSW) LP 51.26% Bob Horne
Dobell (NSW) ALP 51.53% Michael Lee
Macarthur (NSW) ALP 51.69% John Fahey
PREVIOUS ELECTION DATES
Polling day Government elected Seats won Total no. of seats
3 October 1998 LP/NP 80 148
2 March 1996 LP/NP/NCP Coalition 94 148
13 March 1993 ALP 80 147
24 March 1990 ALP 78 148
11 July 1987 ALP 86 148
1 December 1984 ALP 82 148
5 March 1983 ALP 75 125
18 October 1980 LP/NP/NCP 74 125
10 December 1977 LP/NP/NCP 86 124
13 December 1975 LP/NP/NCP 91 127

COUNTING OF THE VOTES

Scrutiny on polling night

Counting of ordinary votes commences immediately after the poll closes at 6pm on polling day. House of Representatives ballot papers are scrutinised before Senate ballot papers. The ballot papers are initially sorted into first preference votes by candidate and informal ballot papers.

House of Representatives

A candidate is elected to the House of Representatives if they gain an absolute majority, that is 50 percent plus one of the formal votes (not 51%).

First, all the first preference votes are counted for each candidate and if a candidate gets more than half the total formal first preference votes, that candidate is elected.

If however, no candidate has more than half of the votes, the candidate with the fewest votes is excluded. This excluded candidates' votes are transferred to the other candidates according to the second preferences shown by voters on the ballot papers.

This process of excluding candidates one by one, continues until one candidate has more than half the total votes and is declared elected.

The distribution of preferences takes place in every division, even when a candidate already has a majority of first preference votes. The result of the full distribution of preferences is used to calculate the final two candidate preferred figures.

Senate

The counting of the Senate ballot papers also begins on polling night. Using the Senate Scrutiny computerised system for the 1998 election took just over four weeks to count the Senate votes in all States and Territories, compared with the six weeks it has taken at previous elections.

To be elected to the Senate, a candidate needs to gain a quota or proportion of the formal votes. The quota is calculated by dividing the total number of formal ballot papers by one more than the number of Senators to be elected and adding 'one' to the result.

The ballot papers are first sorted according to the first preference votes and candidates who receive a quota are elected immediately.

Any surplus votes that elected candidates receive are transferred at a reduced value to the candidates who were the second choice of voters. As it is not possible to determine which votes actually elected the candidate and which are surplus, all the elected candidate's ballot papers are transferred at the reduced value. As a result of transferring surplus votes, other candidates may be elected.

If, however, all surplus votes are transferred and there are still unfilled positions, an exclusion of unsuccessful candidates is undertaken. Starting with the lowest scoring candidate, unelected candidates are excluded from the count and the ballot papers are distributed to the remaining candidates to whom the voters have given their preferences. When a candidate gains a quota following this distribution they are elected. The above process continues until all Senate positions are filled.

Group voting tickets

Senate groups and parties can lodge a group voting ticket with the AEC within 24 hours after the declaration of nominations. A group voting ticket is a written statement setting out a preference ordering of all candidates in the election.

The group voting tickets lodged with the AEC are displayed at every polling place.

All Senate groups are given a box above the line on the Senate ballot paper and all candidates are listed below the line.

The Senate scrutiny is now conducted by a computerised process (the Senate Scrutiny system) which calculates the quota and distributes the preferences and produces the result of the election.

Election costs
Year Cost per voter ($)
1998 5.06
1996 5.08
1993 4.11
1990 4.02
1987 3.75
The estimated cost for the 2001 Federal Election is $68 million.

KEY WORDS

Divisions (electorates)

Australia is divided into 150 voting areas which are know as divisions. One member is elected from each division to the House of Representatives.

DRO

The Divisional Returning Officer (DRO) is the AEC officer responsible for conducting the election in each division and maintaining the roll.

Redistribution

A redistribution is the redrawing of the boundaries of electoral divisions to ensure that there are, as near as practical, the same number of electors in each division for a State or Territory.

Roll

The list of electors eligible to vote at an election.

Scrutineers

People appointed by candidates to observe the voting and the counting of votes. Candidates can appoint scrutineers for each polling place. Scrutineers have the right to be present when the ballot boxes are sealed and opened and when the votes are sorted and counted so that they may check any possible irregularities, but they may not touch any ballot papers.

Swing

The difference between the performance of a candidate or party at this election in comparison with the previous election.

TCP count (Two candidate preferred)

These figures show where preferences have been distributed to the final two candidates in an election. In most, but not all cases, these will be from the two major sides of politics – the ALP and the Liberal and National Party Coalition.

TPP count (Two party preferred)

These figures indicate results where preferences have been distributed to the two major sides of politics – the ALP and the Coalition. In most cases TCP and TPP are the same because the final two candidates are ALP and Coalition. However in an independently held seat the TCP differs from the TPP.

Voter turnout

The percentage of enrolled electors who vote in an election or referendum.

ELECTION LOGISTICS
(All figures detailed below are estimates based on the AEC's 1998 Federal Election)
Polling facilities
Ordinary polling places
No. of ordinary polling places: 7775
Mobile polling teams
No. of mobile polling teams visiting special hospitals: 475
No. of mobile polling teams visiting remote locations: 48
No. of mobile polling teams visiting prisons: 13
Pre-poll centres
No. of pre-poll voting centres: 421
Overseas polling places
No. of overseas polling places: 99
Casual staff
Estimated number of casual staff employed to assist in the conduct of the 1998 federal election: 67 600
Polling equipment required
Ballot boxes
No. of large ballot boxes: 18 000
No. of small ballot boxes: 18 600
Voting screens
No. of large voting screens: 120 000
No. of tabletop voting screens: 16 000
No. of litter bins: 11 700
No. of tables: 4 830
Most cardboard equipment is made from recycled materials and is recycled after the election.

Australian Electoral Commission Contacts

Media Liaison

Members of the media are asked to use the Media Liaison and Head Office contact numbers listed rather than the general enquiry number 13 23 26 which appears on AEC advertising.

Assistant Commissioner
Information and Research
Brien Hallett (acting) (02) 6271 4477

Director, Information
Anthea Wilson (acting) (02) 6271 4415

Assistant Directors, Information
Margaret Meneghel (acting) (02) 6271 4548
Roger Wills (acting) (02) 6271 4431
Susie Smith (02) 6271 4529 Editor, Newsfile
Shirley Weber (02) 6271 4720

Further information

The AEC produces a range of information materials for candidates, journalists and other people interested in the electoral process. Some of the information materials available are:

  • 1998 Electoral Pocketbook: a concise handbook of electoral data and statistics
  • 2001 Divisional Profiles: a publication that details the characteristics of each federal division
  • Nominations Pamphlet: key facts for people considering standing for election
  • Candidate's Handbook: information for candidates in the election
  • Scrutineer's Handbook: information for scrutineers in the election
  • 2001 Federal Electoral Boundaries Map: a map of all electoral Divisions

These and other information materials are available from all AEC offices.

State/Territory Head Offices

The administration of the 2001 Federal Election in each State and Territory is under the control of the Australian Electoral Officer (AEO) for that State or Territory. An AEO for the ACT is temporarily appointed for each election.

AEOs may be contacted on the following numbers.

New South Wales
David Farrell Ph. (02) 9375 6333
Fx. (02) 9281 9384

Victoria
Daryl Wight Ph. (03) 9285 7171
Fx. (03) 9285 7178

Queensland
Bob Longland Ph. (07) 3834 3400
Fx. (07) 3831 7223

Western Australia
Andrew Moyes Ph. (08) 9470 7299
Fx. (08) 9472 3551

South Australia
Dr Christopher Drury Ph. (08) 8237 6555
Fx. (08) 8231 2664

Tasmania
Alex Stanelos Ph. (03) 6235 0500
Fx. (03) 6234 4268

Northern Territory
Bill Shepheard Ph. (08) 8981 1477
Fx. (08) 8981 7964

Australian Capital Territory
Jeff Howarth Ph. (02) 6249 7908
Fx. (02) 6248 7559