Essential information about the Victorian federal redistribution

Updated: 18 October 2017

Why is Victoria undergoing a redistribution?

Victoria is undergoing a redistribution because the number of members of the House of Representatives it is entitled to has increased from 37 to 38 as a result of a determination made by the Electoral Commissioner on Thursday 31 August 2017.

Sub-section 59(2) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (the Electoral Act) specifies that a redistribution process should be undertaken when:

  • the number of members of the House of Representatives to which a state or territory is entitled has changed, or
  • the number of electors in more than one-third of the electoral divisions in a state (or one of the electoral divisions in the Australian Capital Territory or the Northern Territory) deviates from the average divisional enrolment by over ten per cent for a period of more than two months, or
  • a period of seven years has elapsed since the last redistribution process was determined.

The redistribution formally commenced on Monday 4 September 2017.

How many federal electoral divisions will there be after the redistribution?

Victoria is now entitled to 38 federal electoral divisions, which is an increase of one from 37.

Where will the new electoral division be?

Individuals and organisations are able to propose where the new electoral division should be located at two stages of the redistribution process:

  • the suggestions and comments on suggestions stage, and
  • the objections and comments on objections stage.

The Redistribution Committee will consider any ideas it receives in suggestions and comments on suggestions advocating the location of a new federal electoral division and in their proposed redistribution will indicate where the new electoral division is to be located, together with reasons for the proposal.

Individuals and organisations can object to the Redistribution Committee's proposed new electoral division. Objections may agree or disagree with the Redistribution Committee’s proposal. Any ideas received in objections and comments on objections advocating for a particular location of the new federal electoral division will be considered by the augmented Electoral Commission for Victoria, who is ultimately responsible for determining the federal electoral divisions in Victoria.

Will the boundaries of the current electoral divisions change?

Electoral divisions are required to fall within two numerical ranges:

  • the number of electors enrolled in each federal electoral division as at Monday 4 September 2017 must be between minus 10 per cent and plus 10 per cent of the current enrolment quota of 106,954.
    • The number of electors enrolled in each federal electoral division in Victoria must therefore be between 96,259 and 117,649.
  • as far as practicable, the projected number of electors enrolled in each federal electoral division in Victoria  at the projection time of Sunday 25 August 2019 would be between minus 3.5 per cent and plus 3.5 per cent of the projected enrolment quota of 110,372.
    • As far as practicable, the number of electors projected to be enrolled in each federal electoral division in Victoria at the projection time Sunday 25 August 2019 would be between 106,509 and 114,235.

Abolishing an electoral division will, of necessity, result in significant elector movement away from the abolished electoral division and will also require consequential boundary changes and elector movements across the state to ensure that all electoral divisions remain within the two numerical ranges.

Creating an electoral division will, of necessity, require consequential boundary changes and elector movements across the state to ensure that all electoral divisions remain within the two numerical ranges.

Do all Victoria’s federal electoral divisions meet the requirement?

No. On the boundaries in place on Monday 4 September 2017:

  • 27 of Victoria’s 37 federal electoral divisions do not meet this requirement, and
  • two of Victoria’s 37 federal electoral divisions are close to not meeting this requirement.

Electoral division Enrolment as at Monday 4 September 2017 Projected enrolment at Sunday 25 August 2019 Is the requirement met?
Aston  96,121  97,600

No

  • Current enrolment for the Division of Aston is more than 10 per cent under the current enrolment quota
  • Projected enrolment for the Division of Aston is more than 3.5 per cent under the projected enrolment quota
Ballarat  114,365  117,272 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Ballarat is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
Batman  111,540  114,669 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Batman is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
Bendigo  112,053  114,847 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Bendigo is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
Bruce  95,417  97,129

No

  • Current enrolment for the Division of Bruce is more than 10 per cent under the current enrolment quota
  • Projected enrolment for the Division of Bruce is more than 3.5 per cent under the projected enrolment quota
Calwell  111,686  115,471 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Calwell is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
Casey  105,287  107,625 Yes
Chisholm  97,811  100,333 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Chisholm is more than 3.5 per cent under the projected enrolment quota
Corangamite  114,985  119,828 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Corangamite is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
Corio  111,252  113,798 Yes
Deakin  100,139  102,467 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Deakin is more than 3.5 per cent under the projected enrolment quota
Dunkley  107,010  108,773 Yes
Flinders  119,413  122,834

No

  • Current enrolment for the Division of Flinders is more than 10 per cent over the current enrolment quota
  • Projected enrolment for the Division of Flinders is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
Gellibrand  111,245  114,860 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Gellibrand is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
Gippsland  105,907  106,760 Yes – but projected enrolment for the Division of Gippsland is close to being 3.5 per cent under the projected enrolment quota
Goldstein  106,548  108,916 Yes
Gorton  121,382  128,705

No

  • Current enrolment for the Division of Gorton is more than 10 per cent over the current enrolment quota
  • Projected enrolment for the Division of Gorton is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
Higgins  106,308  109,539 Yes
Holt  121,711  131,083

No

  • Current enrolment for the Division of Holt is more than 10 per cent over the current enrolment quota
  • Projected enrolment for the Division of Holt is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
Hotham  100,580  102,745 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Hotham is more than 3.5 per cent under the projected enrolment quota
Indi  105,823  107,510 Yes
Isaacs  107,708  111,982 Yes
Jagajaga  104,207  105,581 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Jagajaga is more than 3.5 per cent under the projected enrolment quota
Kooyong  100,726  102,804 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Kooyong is more than 3.5 per cent under the projected enrolment quota
Lalor  131,058  141,199

No

  • Current enrolment for the Division of Lalor is more than 10 per cent over the current enrolment quota
  • Projected enrolment for the Division of Lalor is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
La Trobe  111,035  116,587 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of La Trobe is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
McEwen  140,152  151,144

No

  • Current enrolment for the Division of McEwen is more than 10 per cent over the current enrolment quota
  • Projected enrolment for the Division of McEwen is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
McMillan  120,880  125,461

No

  • Current enrolment for the Division of McMillan is more than 10 per cent over the current enrolment quota
  • Projected enrolment for the Division of McMillan is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
Mallee  99,931  99,874 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Mallee is more than 3.5 per cent under the projected enrolment quota
Maribyrnong  113,038  116,597 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Maribyrnong is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
Melbourne  117,542  124,147 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Melbourne is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
Melbourne Ports  105,094  108,469 Yes
Menzies  98,857  100,436 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Menzies is more than 3.5 per cent under the projected enrolment quota
Murray  105,643  106,668 Yes – but projected enrolment for the Division of Murray is close to being 3.5 per cent under the projected enrolment quota
Scullin  113,623  118,128 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Scullin is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota
Wannon  99,867  100,062 No – Projected enrolment for the Division of Wannon is more than 3.5 per cent under the projected enrolment quota
Wills  118,314  122,243

No

  • Current enrolment for the Division of Wills is more than 10 per cent over the current enrolment quota
  • Projected enrolment for the Division of Wills is more than 3.5 per cent over the projected enrolment quota

What is the result of requirement not being met?

Inserting a new electoral division into Victoria will require some consequential changes to other electoral division boundaries as creating a new electoral division is not simply a case of dividing two electoral divisions into three as doing so will result in electoral divisions which do not meet the numerical requirements.

Because the requirement to be within the specified range for both enrolment as at Monday 4 September 2017 and projected enrolment as at Sunday 25 August 2019 is not met by all 27 of Victoria's federal electoral divisions, the boundaries of these electoral divisions will need to change.

Changes will be made to some or all of the boundaries of Victoria’s federal electoral divisions. Changes may be made to those federal electoral divisions which meet the requirement as a consequence of making changes to the boundaries of those federal electoral divisions which do not meet the requirement. This is to ensure that all of Victoria’s federal electoral divisions meet the requirement.

What will the name of the new electoral division be?

Ideas as to what the new electoral division should be called are sought.

Individuals and organisations are able to propose names for electoral divisions at two stages of the redistribution process:

  • the suggestions and comments on suggestions stage, and
  • the objections and comments on objections stage.

The Redistribution Committee will consider any ideas it receives in suggestions and comments on suggestions advocating a new name for a federal electoral division and in their proposed redistribution will indicate what their proposed name of the new electoral division is, together with reasons for the proposal.

Individuals and organisations can object to the Redistribution Committee's proposed name of the new federal electoral divisions. Objections may agree or disagree with the Redistribution Committee’s proposal. Any ideas received in objections and comments on objections advocating a change of name for the new federal electoral division will be considered by the augmented Electoral Commission for Victoria, who is ultimately responsible for determining the names of the federal electoral divisions in Victoria.

Will the names of the current electoral divisions change?

The names of the current electoral divisions may or may not change.

Individuals and organisations are able to propose alternative names for electoral divisions at two stages of the redistribution process:

  • the suggestions and comments on suggestions stage, and
  • the objections and comments on objections stage.

The Redistribution Committee will consider any ideas it receives in suggestions and comments on suggestions advocating a change of name for a federal electoral division and in their proposed redistribution will indicate whether it has or has not proposed changing the name of a federal electoral division, together with reasons for the proposal.

Individuals and organisations can object to the Redistribution Committee's proposed names of federal electoral divisions. Objections may agree or disagree with the Redistribution Committee’s proposal. Any ideas received in objections and comments on objections advocating a change of name for a federal electoral division will be considered by the augmented Electoral Commission for Victoria, who is ultimately responsible for determining the names of the federal electoral divisions in Victoria.

Information about the names of current federal electoral divisions in Victoria

How do current electoral division names meet the guidelines for naming electoral divisions?

The Guidelines for naming federal electoral divisions were developed by the AEC from recommendations made by the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters in 1995 in its Report on the Effectiveness and Appropriateness of the Redistribution Provisions of Parts III and IV of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918. These guidelines are non-binding but may be referred to by the Redistribution Committee for Victoria or the augmented Electoral Commission for Victoria to assist with their decision making process.

The extent to which the names of Victoria's current federal electoral divisions meet these guidelines is displayed below.  The electoral divisions are sortable by clicking on the header row.

Electoral division Is the electoral division named for a prominent person? Is the electoral division named for an Australian Prime Minister? Is the electoral division name that of an original Federation electoral division? Is the electoral division named for a geographical feature? Is the electoral division named for an aboriginal person or word?
Aston Yes No No No No
Ballarat No No Yes Yes Yes
Batman Yes No No No No
Bendigo No No Yes Yes No
Bruce Yes Yes No No No
Calwell Yes No No No No
Casey Yes No No No No
Chisholm Yes No No No No
Corangamite No No Yes Yes Yes
Corio No No Yes Yes Yes
Deakin Yes Yes No No No
Dunkley Yes No No No No
Flinders Yes No Yes No No
Gellibrand Yes No No No No
Gippsland No No Yes Yes No
Goldstein Yes No No No No
Gorton Yes Yes No No No
Higgins Yes No No No No
Holt Yes Yes No No No
Hotham Yes No No No No
Indi No No Yes Yes Yes
Isaacs Yes No No No No
Jagajaga Yes No No No Yes
Kooyong No No Yes No Yes
Lalor Yes No No No No
La Trobe Yes No No No No
Mallee No No No Yes Yes
Maribyrnong No No No Yes Yes
McEwen Yes Yes No No No
McMillan Yes No No No No
Melbourne No No Yes Yes No
Melbourne Ports No No Yes Yes No
Menzies Yes Yes No No No
Murray No No No Yes No
Scullin Yes Yes No No No
Wannon No No Yes Yes Yes
Wills Yes No No No No
Information about current electoral division names
Aston Chisholm Gippsland Isaacs McEwen Wannon
Ballarat Corangamite Goldstein Jagajaga McMillan Wills
Batman Corio Gorton Kooyong Melbourne  
Bendigo Deakin Higgins Lalor Melbourne Ports  
Bruce Dunkley Holt La Trobe Menzies  
Calwell Flinders Hotham Mallee Murray  
Casey Gellibrand Indi Maribyrnong Scullin  

Aston

Origins of name

The Division of Aston is named for Tilly Aston 1873–1947, blind writer and teacher who helped found the library of the Victorian Association of Braille Writers in 1894.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 14 September 1984 and was first represented in 1984.

More information

Biographical information about Tilly Aston from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Ballarat

Origins of name

The Division of Ballarat is named for the city of Ballarat. The name is apparently derived from the Aboriginal word 'balaarat' meaning a resting or camping place.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 26 September 1900 and was first represented in 1901.

More information

Information about the city of Ballarat can be found by conducting a search on the VICNAMES website.

Batman

Origins of name

The Division of Batman is named for John Batman 1801–39, the early settler and explorer, known as the 'Founder of Melbourne'.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 13 July 1906 and was first represented in 1906.

More information

Biographical information about John Batman from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Bendigo

Origins of name

The Division of Bendigo is named for the city which is its main centre.

Creation of electoral division

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 26 September 1900 and was first represented in 1901.

More information

Information about the city of Bendigo can be found by conducting a search on the VICNAMES website.

Bruce

Origins of name

The Division of Bruce is named for Lord Stanley Bruce 1883–1967, Prime Minister of Australia 1923–29.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 10 August 1955 and was first represented in 1955.

More information

Biographical information about Lord Stanley Bruce from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Calwell

Origins of name

The Division of Calwell is named for Arthur Calwell 1896–1973, Member of House of Representatives 1940–72, Leader of the Australian Labor Party 1960–67.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 14 September 1984 and was first represented in 1984.

More information

Biographical information about Arthur Calwell from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Casey

Origins of name

The Division of Casey is named for Lord Richard Casey 1890–1976, Governor-General of Australia 1965–69.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 21 November 1968 and was first represented in 1969.

More information

Biographical information about Lord Richard Casey from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Chisholm

Origins of name

The Division of Chisholm is named for Caroline Chisholm 1808–77, noted social worker and advocate of immigration to New South Wales.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 11 May 1949 and was first represented in 1949.

More information

Biographical information about Caroline Chisholm from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Corangamite

Origins of name

The Division of Corangamite is named for Lake Corangamite. The name of the lake originated from the Aboriginal word for 'bitter', describing the salt content of the lake.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 26 September 1900 and was first represented in 1901.

More information

Information about Lake Corangamite can be found by conducting a search on the VICNAMES website.

Corio

Origins of name

The Division of Corio is named for Corio Bay which originated from an Aboriginal word 'coraiyo' meaning 'small marsupial' or 'sandy cliffs'.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 26 September 1900 and was first represented in 1901.

More information

Information about Corio Bay can be found by conducting a search on the VICNAMES website.

Deakin

Origins of name

The Division of Deakin is named for Alfred Deakin 1856–1919, Prime Minister of Australia 1903–04, 1905–08 and 1909–10.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 21 July 1937 and was first represented in 1937.

More information

Biographical information about Alfred Deakin from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Dunkley

Origins of name

The Division of Dunkley is named for Louisa Dunkley 1866–1927, founder of the Victorian Women's Post and Telegraph Association in 1900 and campaigner for equal pay for women.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 14 September 1984 and was first represented in 1984.

More information

Biographical information about Louisa Dunkley from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Flinders

Origins of name

The Division of Flinders is named for Matthew Flinders 1774–1814, well-known navigator and explorer. The adoption of the name Australia is due to him.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 26 September 1900 and was first represented in 1901.

More information

Biographical information about Matthew Flinders from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Gellibrand

Origins of name

The Division of Gellibrand is named for Joseph Gellibrand 1786–1836, lawyer and explorer.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 11 May 1949 and was first represented in 1949.

More information

Biographical information about for Joseph Gellibrand from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Gippsland

Origins of name

The Division of Gippsland is named for the area which was explored by Angus McMillan in 1839. It was named after Governor Sir George Gipps.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 26 September 1900 and was first represented in 1901.

More information

Information about Gippsland can be found by conducting a search on the VICNAMES website.

Goldstein

Origins of name

The Division of Goldstein is named for Vida Goldstein 1869–1949, suffragist and feminist

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 14 September 1984 and was first represented in 1984.

More information

Biographical information about Vida Goldstein from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Gorton

Origins of name

The Division of Gorton is named for former Prime Minister Sir John Gorton, who served as Prime Minister between 1968 and 1971.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 29 January 2003 and was first represented in 2004.

More information

Biographical information about Sir John Gorton from the National Archives of Australia

Higgins

Origins of name

The Division of Higgins is named for Henry Higgins 1851–1929, Member of the House of Representatives 1901–06, Justice of the High Court 1906–29 and President of the new Commonwealth Conciliation and Arbitration Court 1907–21.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 11 May 1949 and was first represented in 1949.

More information

Biographical information about Henry Higgins from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Holt

Origins of name

The Division of Holt is named for Harold Edward Holt 1908–67, Prime Minister of Australia 1966–67, who disappeared while swimming off Portsea Beach in 1967.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 21 November 1968 and was first represented in 1969.

More information

Biographical information about Harold Holt from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Hotham

Origins of name

The Division of Hotham is named for Sir Charles Hotham 1806–55, Governor of Victoria 1854–55.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 21 November 1968 and was first represented in 1969.

More information

Biographical information about Sir Charles Hotham from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Indi

Origins of name

The Division of Indi is named for an Aboriginal name for the Murray River.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 26 September 1900 and was first represented in 1901.

Isaacs

Origins of name

The Division of Isaacs is named for Sir Isaac Isaacs 1855–1948, Member of the House of Representatives 1901–06, Chief Justice of the High Court 1930 and Governor-General of Australia 1931–36.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 11 May 1949 and was first represented in 1949.

More information

Biographical information about Sir Isaac Isaacs from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Jagajaga

Origins of name

The Division of Jagajaga is named for the three principal Aboriginal elders who signed a treaty with John Batman in 1835 which intended to give the white settlers 500,000 acres of land at the north-west end of Port Phillip Bay and 100,000 acres around Geelong.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 14 September 1984 and was first represented in 1984.

Kooyong

Origins of name

The Division of Kooyong is named for the Aboriginal word meaning 'resting place'.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 26 September 1900 and was first represented 1901.

More information

Information about Kooyong can be found by conducting a search on the VICNAMES website.

Lalor

Origins of name

The Division of Lalor is named for Peter Lalor 1827–89, leader of the Eureka Stockade rebellion in 1854. In 1855 he was one of the first representatives from the goldfields elected to the Victorian Legislative Council.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 11 May 1949 and was first represented in 1949.

More information

Biographical information about Peter Lalor from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

La Trobe

Origins of name

The Division of La Trobe is named for Charles La Trobe 1801–75, first Lieutenant-Governor of Victoria 1851–54.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 11 May 1949 and was first represented in 1949.

More information

Biographical information about Charles La Trobe from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Mallee

Origins of name

The Division of Mallee is named for the area in which it is located. Mallee is an Aboriginal word for dwarf eucalypts which grow in the area.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 11 May 1949 and was first represented in 1949.

Maribyrnong

Origins of name

The Division of Maribyrnong is named for the Maribyrnong River. Maribyrnong is an Aboriginal word for 'yam' or 'edible root'.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 13 July 1906 and was first represented in 1906.

More information

Information about the Maribyrnong River can be found by conducting a search on the VICNAMES website.

McEwen

Origins of name

The Division of McEwen is named for Sir John McEwen 1900–80, who served as caretaker Prime Minister of Australia for three weeks 1967–68.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 14 September 1984 and was first represented in 1984.

More information

Biographical information about Sir John McEwen from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

McMillan

Origins of name

The Division of McMillan is named for Angus McMillan 1810–65, pioneer and explorer who made several trips into Gippsland.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 11 May 1949 and was first represented in 1949.

More information

Biographical information about Angus McMillan from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Melbourne

Origins of name

The Division of Melbourne is named for the city of Melbourne which was named in 1837 by Governor Bourke after Lord Melbourne, who was then Prime Minister of Britain.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 26 September 1900 and was first represented in 1901.

More information

Information about the city of Melbourne can be found by conducting a search on the VICNAMES website.

Melbourne Ports

Origins of name

The Division of Melbourne Ports is named for the area in which it is located.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 26 September 1900 and was first represented in 1901.

Menzies

Origins of name

The Division of Menzies is named for Sir Robert Menzies 1894–1978, Prime Minister of Australia 1939–41 and 1949–66.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 14 September 1984 and was first represented in 1984.

More information

Biographical information about Sir Robert Menzies from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Murray

Origins of name

The Division of Murray is named for the Murray River which was named by Charles Sturt in 1830 after Sir George Murray, Colonial Secretary.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 11 May 1949 and was first represented in 1949.

More information

Information about the Murray River can be found by conducting a search on the VICNAMES website.  

Scullin

Origins of name

The Division of Scullin is named for James Scullin 1876–1953, Prime Minister of Australia 1929–32.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 10 August 1955 and was first represented in 1955.

More information

Biographical information about James Scullin from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Wannon

Origins of name

The Division of Wannon is named for the Wannon River which was named by Major Mitchell in 1836.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 26 September 1900 and was first represented in 1901.

More information

Information about the Wannon River can be found by conducting a search on the VICNAMES website.

Wills

Origins of name

The Division of Wills is named for William Wills 1834–61, explorer and member of expedition which attempted to cross Australia in 1860–61.

Creation of electoral division

The first electoral division of this name was created on 11 May 1949 and was first represented in 1949.

More information

Biographical information about William Wills from the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

When will the redistribution come into effect?

Changes to federal electoral divisions as a result of this redistribution will apply from the day on which a notice of determination is published in the Commonwealth Notices Government Gazette. This notice will be published on 13 July 2018.

Electoral events will not be contested on these new federal electoral divisions until a writ is issued for a general election following the expiry or dissolution of the House of Representatives.

Should a writ for a general election be issued before the notice of determination is published, a mini-redistribution will be conducted. For further information, see:

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