Proposed redistribution of the Australian Capital Territory into electoral divisions

Updated: 11 September 2015

Appendices

Appendix A: Summary of compliance with legislative requirements

Provision of the Electoral Act Requirement Compliance
para 59(2)(c) Basis for conducting redistribution More than seven years had elapsed since the last redistribution of the Australian Capital Territory was determined on 9 December 2005
s.59(1) Direction to commence redistribution via notice published in the Gazette Gazette notice published on Monday 1 December 2014
s.63A(4) Projection time for equality of enrolments The Electoral Commission noted on Monday 1 December 2014 that the projection time is 28 July 2019
s.65 Determination of current enrolment quota by written instrument The then acting Electoral Commissioner determined the quota by signing the written instrument on Monday 8 December 2014
s.60(7B) Determination in writing of the senior Divisional Returning Officer for the Australian Capital Territory The Electoral Commission made a written determination on Saturday 11 April 2015
s.60(1) Appointment of the Redistribution Committee by written instrument The Electoral Commission signed the written instrument on Saturday 11 April 2015
s.64(1) and (2) Invitation to make written suggestions and written comments on suggestions Gazette notice published on Wednesday 29 April 2015
Notice published in The Canberra Times and The Australian on Saturday 2 May 2015
para 64(1)(a) Suggestions close at 6pm on the 5th Friday after publication of the Gazette notice Suggestions closed at 6pm (AEST) on Friday 29 May 2015
s.64(3) Suggestions made available for public perusal on the 5th Monday after publication of the Gazette notice Suggestions were made available in the office of the senior Divisional Returning Officer for the Australian Capital Territory on Monday 1 June 2015
para 64(1)(b) Comments on suggestions close at 6pm on the 7th Friday after publication of the Gazette notice Comments closed at 6pm (AEST) on Friday 12 June 2015
s.64(4) Consideration of all suggestions and comments on suggestions received by the statutory timeframe The Redistribution Committee considered each of the eight suggestions and two comments on suggestions received at their meetings
s.66(1) The Redistribution Committee shall make a proposed redistribution The Redistribution Committee’s proposed redistribution is stated in Chapter 2 of this report
s.66(4) In a proposed redistribution of the Australian Capital Territory, the whole of the Jervis Bay Territory shall be included in one proposed electoral division The Redistribution Committee has decided to include the Jervis Bay Territory in the proposed Division of Fenner
s.67 Reasons for the proposed redistribution are stated in writing The Redistribution Committee’s reasons are stated in Chapter 2 of this report

Appendix B: Operation of statutory requirements for the making of a proposed redistribution

Section 66 of the Electoral Act requires the Redistribution Committee for the Australian Capital Territory to abide by the following requirements:

  • make a proposed redistribution of the Australian Capital Territory,
  • the number of electoral divisions the Australian Capital Territory is to be divided into equal the number of members of the House of Representatives to be chosen in the Australian Capital Territory at a general election, and
  • abide by the following requirements:
    1. In making the proposed redistribution, the Redistribution Committee:
      1. shall, as far as practicable, endeavour to ensure that, if the State or Territory were redistributed in accordance with the proposed redistribution, the number of electors enrolled in each Electoral Division in the State or Territory would not, at the projection time determined under section 63A, be less than 96.5% or more than 103.5% of the average divisional enrolment of that State or Territory at that time; and
      2. subject to paragraph (a), shall give due consideration, in relation to each proposed Electoral Division, to:
        1. community of interests within the proposed Electoral Division, including economic, social and regional interests;
        2. means of communication and travel within the proposed Electoral Division;
        1. the physical features and area of the proposed Electoral Division; and
        2. the boundaries of existing Divisions in the State or Territory;
          and subject thereto, the quota of electors for the State or Territory shall be the basis for the proposed redistribution, and the Redistribution Committee may adopt a margin of allowance, to be used whenever necessary, but in no case shall the quota be departed from to a greater extent than one-tenth more or one-tenth less.
    1. (A) When applying subsection (3), the Redistribution Committee must treat the matter in subparagraph (3)(b)(v) as subordinate to the matters in subparagraphs (3)(b)(i), (ii) and (iv).

These statutory requirements are expressed in a hierarchical order.

The purpose of paragraph 3(a) is suggested by its history. It has undergone some transformation since the Commonwealth Electoral Legislation Amendment Act 1983 stipulated that boundaries were to be drawn, as far as practicable, to achieve equal numbers of electors in each of a state’s electoral divisions three-and-a-half years after a redistribution. By 1984 ‘it was observed that the three-and-a-half year rule had in some areas forced the adoption, on purely numerical grounds, of boundaries which took little account of perceived community of interest’.18 Therefore, in 1987, the rule was relaxed to permit a measure of tolerance to plus or minus two percent from average projected enrolment. Subsequently, the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters concluded that:

the numerical criteria do not allow “due consideration”, in the words of the Act, to be given to the qualitative factors. Rather, the political parties and others attempting to frame electoral boundaries essentially find themselves engaged in a mathematical modelling exercise. In order to relax the enrolment requirements to that extent necessary to allow a realistic degree of flexibility the Committee recommends … that subsections 66(3)(a) and 73(4)(a) of the Electoral Act be amended, so as to extend the variation from average divisional enrolment allowed three-and-a-half years after a redistribution from two to 3.5 percent.19

The Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters also, in the same report, refers to its recommended amendment as one that ‘would maintain substantial restrictions on malapportionment [and] would allow other legitimate policy objectives to be more effectively met’.

Paragraph 3(a) follows this recommendation. The terms of the recommendation, and the discussion which preceded it, make clear the purpose of paragraph 3(a), as it now stands, and how it was intended to interact with the other criteria set out in the sub-paragraphs of paragraph (b), to which also ‘due consideration’ must be given. The Redistribution Committee has considered the suggestions and comments and made its proposed redistribution on this basis.

In summary, the primary criteria are to:

  • endeavour to ensure that the number of electors in the proposed electoral divisions are within a range of 3.5 per cent below or above the projected enrolment quota at the projection time, and
  • ensure that current enrolments are within 10 per cent below or above the current enrolment quota.

The secondary criteria are community of interests, means of communication and travel, and physical features and area. The Redistribution Committee also considers the boundaries of existing electoral divisions; however this criterion is subordinate to the others.

Appendix C: Suggestions for the Australian Capital Territory redistribution

Eight written suggestions were received.
No. Submitted by
S1 Martin Gordon
S2 Michael Hedger
S3 David Ray
S4 Jeff Waddell
S5 Warren Grzic
S6 Mark Mulcair
S7 Darren McSweeney
S8 David Wedgwood

Appendix D: Comments on suggestions for the Australian Capital Territory redistribution

Two written comments on suggestions were received.
No. Submitted by
CS1 Mark Mulcair
CS2 David Wedgwood

Appendix E: Redistribution Committee response to themes contained in suggestions and comments on suggestions

Suggestions and comments on suggestions recommend… Submission The Redistribution Committee has…
No. Submitted by
the location of particular areas in the Division of Canberra S1 Martin Gordon

for reasons of community of interests, proposed the following areas be moved from the current Division of Fraser to the proposed Division of Canberra:

  • Acton
  • Black Mountain Nature Reserve
  • Campbell
  • City
  • Reid
  • Russell
  • parts of Barton, Braddon, Parkes, Pialligo, Turner, the District of Molonglo Valley and the District of Majura
S4 Jeff Waddell
S5 Warrick Gzric
S6 Mark Mulcair
S7 Darren McSweeney
CS1 Mark Mulcair
not altering the name of the Division of Fraser S7 Darren McSweeney proposed altering the name of the Division of Fraser to the Division of Fenner
CS2 David Wedgwood
the Division of Fraser be co-named in honour of both the former member for the Australian Capital Territory, James Fraser, and the former Prime Minister, the Rt Hon. John Malcolm Fraser AC CH S1 Martin Gordon proposed the Division of Fraser not be co-named
S6 Mark Mulcair
S7 Darren McSweeney
C2 David Wedgwood
CS1 Mark Mulcair
the name of the Division of Fraser be changed S2 Michael Hedger proposed the name of the Division of Fraser be changed to the Division of Fenner
S4 Jeff Waddell
S5 Warrick Gzric
S6 Mark Mulcair
S7 Darren McSweeney
CS1 Mark Mulcair
CS2 David Wedgwood
the name of the Division of Canberra be changed S6 Mark Mulcair proposed the name of the Division of Canberra not be changed
S8 David Wedgwood
CS2 David Wedgwood
the Australian Capital Territory should be entitled to three seats in the House of Representatives, not two S3 David Ray formed the opinion that the suggestion was not based on a ground that could be considered by the Redistribution Committee in making a proposed redistribution of electoral boundaries. The Redistribution Committee came to this conclusion because the Australian Capital Territory remains entitled to two seats in the House of Representatives as determined by the then acting Electoral Commissioner on Thursday 13 November 2014

S = suggestion received and CS = comment on suggestion received (refer to Appendix C and Appendix D for full list)

Appendix F: Constructing proposed electoral boundaries

The AEC maintains the electoral roll on the basis of alignment to Statistical Area 1s (SA1s),20 and is able to provide data on enrolments and projected enrolments at this level. Accordingly, in formulating its proposals, the Redistribution Committee used SA1s as its basic building blocks. The SA1s have defined boundaries and are of differing sizes and shapes. In cases where the Redistribution Committee considered that a particular SA1 boundary was inappropriate for use as an electoral division boundary, the SA1 was split to provide a more meaningful boundary.

The indicative area of electoral divisions in the Australian Capital Territory has been calculated by aggregating the area of:

  • all land-based SA1s;
  • any parts of land-based SA1s; and
  • any lakes, ponds, rivers, creeks, wetlands or marshes not already included in land-based SA1s, that are contained within the divisional boundary of each electoral division.

Areas are calculated on the Geocentric Datum of Australia (GDA94) spheroid using the AEC’s Electoral Boundary Mapping System (EBMS), developed within the ‘MapInfo Professional’ software package.

The Redistribution Committee used EBMS as an aid to modelling various boundary options. This system was also made available for public use at the office of the senior Divisional Returning Officer for the Australian Capital Territory in Canberra.

Appendix G: Guidelines for naming federal electoral divisions

Determining the names of federal electoral divisions is part of the process of conducting a federal redistribution within a state or territory.

The criteria used by redistribution committees to propose the names of electoral divisions, and used by augmented electoral commissions to determine the names of electoral divisions, have previously been the subject of recommendations from the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters. From these recommendations, a set of guidelines were developed as a point of reference only.

It should be noted that redistribution committees and augmented electoral commissions are in no way bound by the guidelines.

Naming after persons

In the main, electoral divisions should be named after deceased Australians who have rendered outstanding service to their country.

When new electoral divisions are created the names of former Prime Ministers should be considered.

Federation Divisional names

Every effort should be made to retain the names of original federation electoral divisions.

Geographical names

Locality or place names should generally be avoided, but in certain areas the use of geographical features may be appropriate (e.g. Perth).

Aboriginal names

Aboriginal names should be used where appropriate and as far as possible existing Aboriginal divisional names should be retained.

Other criteria

The names of Commonwealth electoral divisions should not duplicate existing state districts.

Qualifying names may be used where appropriate (e.g. Melbourne Ports, Port Adelaide).

Names of electoral divisions should not be changed or transferred to new areas without very strong reasons.

When two or more electoral divisions are partially combined, as far as possible the name of the new electoral division should be that of the old electoral division which had the greatest number of electors within the new boundaries. However, where the socio-demographic nature of the electoral division in question has changed significantly, this should override the numerical formula.

Appendix H: Additional potential names of electoral divisions considered by the Redistribution Committee

Name Lifespan Occupation
Dr Coral Bell AO 1923–2012 Professor of International Relations
Olive Brown 1945–1993 Aboriginal health worker and activist
Charles Manning Hope Clark AC 1915–1991 Author
Isabel Coe 1951–2012 Campaigner for indigenous sovereignty
Helen Craven Crisp AM 1916–2002 Education
Betty Churcher AO 1931–2015 Arts director and educator, painter, television host, author
Sylvia Curley OAM 1890–1943 Nurse, advocate, farmer, local historian
Henrietta (Jessie) Shaw Daley 1890–1943 Community worker
Rosemary Dobson AO 1920–2012 Poet
Marian Eldridge 1936–1997 Author
Miles Franklin 1879–1954 Novelist
Professor Frank Fenner AC CMG MBE FAA FRS FRACP FRCP 1914–2010 Microbiologist and virologist
Kenneth Lionel 'Ken' Fry 1920–2007 Member of the House of Representatives for the Division of Fraser between 1974–84
Sir Robert Randolph Garran GCMG 1867–1957 Secretary of the Attorney-General's Department
Rosalie Norah King Gascoigne AM 1917–1999 Artist
Peter Firman Harrison 1918–1990 First chief planner of the National Capital Development Commission
A D (Alec Derwent) Hope AC OBE 1907–2000 Poet, critic, reviewer and editor
Joshua John Moore 1790–1864 First pastoralist to occupy land in Canberra
Mancell Gwenneth Pinner 1922–1998 Radiologist
Charles Robert Scrivener ISO 1855–1923 Surveyor
Betty Searle 1916–2003 Social justice advocate
Margaret Timpson AM 1941–1993 Statistician and advocate for women's participation in sport

Appendix I: Timetable for the remainder of the redistribution of the Australian Capital Territory

Provision of the Electoral Act Requirement Date
s.68(2) Invitation to make written objections and written comments on objections Gazette notice to be published on Friday 11 September 2015
para 68(2)(a) Objections close at 6pm on the 4th Friday after publication of the Gazette notice Written objections must be received by 6pm (AEDT) on Friday 9 October 2015
s.69(2) Objections made available for public perusal starting on the 5th Monday after publication of the Gazette notice Objections will be made available in the office of the senior Divisional Returning Officer for the Australian Capital Territory and on the AEC website on Monday 12 October 2015
para 68(2)(b) Comments on objections close at 6pm on the 6th Friday after publication of the Gazette notice Comments on objections must be received by 6pm (AEDT) on Friday 23 October 2015
s.69(4) Comments on objections made available for public perusal starting on the 7th Monday after publication of the Gazette notice Comments on objections will be made available in the office of the senior Divisional Returning Officer for the Australian Capital Territory and on the AEC website on Monday 26 October 2015
s.72(1) Consideration of all objections and comments on objections received by the statutory timeframe The augmented Electoral Commission will consider objections and comments on objections during October and November 2015
s.72(3) Public inquiry/inquiries into objections and comments on objections held (if required) Date(s) to be advised1
para 72(10)(b) The augmented Electoral Commission announces the proposed redistribution Date to be advised
s.72(12) and (13) Further objection period – if required Date(s) to be advised
s.73(1) Determination of names and boundaries of electoral divisions published in the Gazette Thursday 28 January 2016
s.75(2) Redistribution report laid before both Houses of Parliament Date to be advised
  Redistribution report and maps available to the public Date to be advised

1.A public inquiry, if required, would be held in early November 2015.

Appendix J: General description of how proposed electoral divisions are constituted

The following tables show how each proposed electoral division has been constructed from existing electoral divisions. The unit to display this construction is Statistical Area 2s (SA2s).21 Each SA2 comprises a number of SA1s. The SA1s and SA2s which applied at the 2011 Census of Population and Housing have been used.

Proposed electoral divisions are displayed in alphabetical order.

Proposed Division of Canberra
Proposed division make up Enrolment as at 1 December 2014 Projected enrolment as at 28 July 2019
Electors retained from the current Division of Canberra
ACT – East 558 561
ACT – South West 790 790
Banks 3 537 3 933
Bonython 2 836 3 060
Calwell 4 274 4 664
Chapman 2 215 2 309
Chifley 1 785 1 900
Chisholm 3 858 4 097
Conder 3 663 4 054
Curtin 3 958 4 101
Deakin 2 303 2 373
Duffy 2 372 2 543
Fadden 2 438 2 566
Farrer 2 580 2 608
Fisher 2 260 2 417
Forrest 1 307 1 377
Garran 2 317 2 388
Gilmore 2 026 2 196
Gordon (ACT) 5 670 6 171
Gowrie (ACT) 2 391 2 566
Greenway 1 242 1 367
Griffith (ACT) 3 291 3 483
Holder 2 080 2 214
Hughes 2 174 2 138
Hume 15 15
Isaacs 1 922 1 982
Isabella Plains 3 042 3 393
Kambah 11 645 12 443
Kingston – Barton 4 083 4 323
Lake Burley Griffin 0 0
Lyons (ACT) 2 058 2 164
Macarthur 1 172 1 264
Mawson 2 234 2 425
Monash 4 329 4 466
Mount Taylor 1 1
Namadgi 35 35
Narrabundah 4 298 4 401
O’Malley 725 725
Oxley (ACT) 1 318 1 451
Parkes (ACT) 0 0
Pearce 1 942 2 056
Phillip 1 506 1 660
Red Hill (ACT) 2 330 2 308
Richardson 2 212 2 411
Rivett 2 465 2 642
Stirling 1 449 1 532
Theodore 2 753 2 998
Torrens 1 697 1 815
Tuggeranong 23 23
Wanniassa 5 836 6 254
Waramanga 1 976 2 080
Weston 2 572 2 621
Yarralumla 2 444 2 474
Total electors retained from the current Division of Canberra 128 007 135 838
Electors transferred from another electoral division into the proposed Division of Canberra
Electors transferred from the current Division of Fraser
Acton 602 604
Braddon 1 528 1 629
Campbell 3 623 3 843
Civic 1 722 1 799
Majura 82 82
Molonglo 5 5
Reid 1 159 1 212
Turner 1 505 1 631
Total transferred from the existing Division of Fraser 10 226 10 805
Total electors transferred from another electoral division into the proposed Division of Canberra 10 226 10 805
Total for proposed Division of Canberra 138 233 146 643
Proposed Division of Fenner
Proposed division make up Enrolment as at 1 December 2014 Projected enrolment as at 28 July 2019
Electors retained from the current Division of Fraser
Ainslie 3 990 4 146
Amaroo 3 659 4 149
Aranda 1 840 1 899
Belconnen 3 348 3 572
Bonner 2 874 3 108
Braddon 1 799 1 935
Bruce 4 003 4 325
Casey 2 207 2 362
Charnwood 2 115 2 321
Cook 2 202 2 320
Crace 1 751 1 944
Dickson 1 547 1 649
Downer 2 581 2 754
Dunlop 4 821 5 450
Evatt 3 878 4 216
Florey 3 593 3 883
Flynn (ACT) 2 601 2 821
Forde 2 382 2 631
Franklin 2 925 3 332
Fraser 1 584 1 707
Giralang 2 529 2 694
Gooromon 6 6
Gungahlin 3 467 3 928
Gungahlin – East 16 16
Gungahlin – West 100 100
Hackett 2 253 2 417
Hall 238 238
Harrison 3 583 3 995
Hawker 2 223 2 344
Higgins 2 240 2 362
Holt 3 460 3 716
Jervis Bay 161 167
Kaleen 5 532 5 901
Kowen 15 15
Latham 2 740 2 931
Lawson 0 0
Lyneham 3 810 3 966
Macgregor (ACT) 4 553 4 962
Macquarie 1 883 2 064
Majura 75 75
McKellar 2 113 2 245
Melba 2 402 2 536
Mitchell 3 3
Molonglo 17 17
Ngunnawal 6 186 7 008
Nicholls 5 023 5 516
O’Connor (ACT) 3 991 4 224
Page 1 939 1 882
Palmerston 3 901 4 308
Scullin 2 047 2 255
Spence 1 933 2 121
Turner 1 240 1 330
Watson 4 027 4 312
Weetangera 1 985 2 073
Total electors retained from the current Division of Fraser 131 391 142 251
Electors transferred from the current Division of Fraser to another proposed electoral division
Electors transferred to the proposed Division of Canberra
Acton -602 -604
Braddon -1 528 -1 629
Campbell -3 623 -3 843
Civic -1 722 -1 799
Majura -82 -82
Molonglo -5 -5
Reid -1 159 -1 212
Turner -1 505 -1 631
Total transferred to the proposed Division of Canberra -10 226 -10 805
Total electors transferred from the current Division of Fraser to another proposed electoral division -10 226 -10 805
Total for proposed Division of Fenner 131 391 142 251

  1. Joint Standing Committee on Electoral MattersReport on the Effectiveness and Appropriateness of the Redistribution Provisions of Parts III and IV of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (December 1995), paragraph 4.3
  2. ibid., paragraph 4.11
  3. SA1s are the smallest unit at which ABS makes available disaggregated Census data. There are currently 54 805 SA1s with populations in the range of 200 – 800. SA1s, which are part of the Australian Statistical Geography Standard, are defined by the ABS and remain stable between censuses. The SA1s currently in use were defined for the 2011 Census.
  4. SA2s are an area defined in the Australian Statistical Geography Standard, and consist of one or more whole SA1s. Wherever possible, SA2s are based on officially gazetted state/territory suburbs and localities. In urban areas SA2s largely conform to whole suburbs and combinations of whole suburbs, while in rural areas they define functional zones of social and economic links. Geography is also taken into account in SA2 design.